Grumman F14 Tomcat

These photos were taken by Steve Stohr 

Steve Stohr is the proud owner of North American Hobbies online hobby shop.

Photos below were taken at EAA Airventure 2000 in July

Captions provided by David W. Aungst ---  thanks David!!!

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 Left side of the nose.  Visible are the Television Sensor Unit (TVSU) camera under the nose and the 20mm cannon opening on the side of the nose. Close-up of the TVSU camera.  This sensor is equivalent to the Target
Identification System Electro-Optic (TISEO) sensor on the F-4E Phantom.  The
fairing under the camera is the ARN-100 antenna.  The red item is the forward anti-collision light.
Close-up of the cannon port and the three intakes that assist in the venting of gun gases from the cannon bay.

Close-up of the cannon port.

 


 

The nose landing gear, slightly left of head-on.  Note the landing light
and the three approach lights on the upper strut.
The nose landing gear, slightly left of head-on.  Note the landing light
and the three approach lights on the upper strut.
The nose landing gear viewed from the left rear quarter.  Note the
extension of the oleo and torque linkage.  This oleo is the portion of the strut that compresses for the F-14 to hook up to a catapult for launching
off of the carrier.
The nose landing gear viewed from the right front quarter.  Note the
angles the wheel well doors are hanging at.

 

Close-up of the wheel well doors, right side.  Forward on the aircraft is to the right of the picture.  Pay particular attention to the angle of the smaller rear door.

The upper nose landing gear, viewed from the right rear quarter.  Note the wiring harnesses and the attachment point for the retraction strut.

Broader view of the previous picture, showing most of the retraction strut.  Again, note the angles on the wheel well doors.  The trough in the lower fuselage (that fills most of the upper portion of the picture) is the front end of the right, forward Sparrow missile well. Nose wheel well.  The picture is looking forward and slightly left on the aircraft to view the left front corner of the wheel well.

 

Overview of the nose landing gear, viewed from the right side.  The small braces that attach to the torque links are the mechanical linkage to lower the catapult arm when the nose strut compresses. Overview of the nose landing gear, viewed from the right rear quarter. Nose wheel well.  The picture is looking forward and slightly left on the aircraft to view the left front corner and front wall of the wheel well.

Nose wheel well.  The picture is looking rearward and slightly left on the aircraft to view the left rear corner of the wheel well and the upper landing gear strut.  Note the multitude of wires and plumbing that live in the rear portion of the wheel well.

 

Nose wheel well.  The picture is looking rearward and slightly right on the aircraft to view the right rear corner of the wheel well and the upper landing gear strut.  Note the retraction linkage attached to the door.  As the landing gear strut retracts into the wheel well, it is caught in a clamp (at the top of the door linkage) that pulls the doors closed.  There are no hydraulics attached to the nose wheel well doors. Nose wheel well.  The picture is looking rearward and slightly left on the aircraft to view the left side of the wheel well.  Note the left side door retraction linkage. Same as previous picture.

 

Close-up of the right engine intake bleed air ramp.

 

Overall view of the right engine intake.  Note the color lines where the gray camouflage gives way to the white duct color.  Note also the dirtiness of the rear portion of the ducting. ECM blisters on the right wing glove area.  These are part of the ALQ-126 fit for the aircraft.  These blisters were introduced on the block 110 F-14A airframes and are present on all subsequent aircraft. Right main wheel well area, viewed from the front.  Note the "spaghetti factory" of wires and plumbing running all over the side walls.

Right main wheel well, looking in from the front right to see the space above the engine air intake where the main wheel retracts into.

 

The right main wheel.  Note the spoke pattern.  This pattern has changed over the F-14 block numbers and years.  Some model kits give alternate wheels to provide the correct spokes, others do not.  Right main landing gear, viewed from the right rear quarter.

 

Right main landing gear, viewed from behind.  Note the interlock strut
that engages the side of the fuselage to help support the main strut.
Right wing glove weapons pylon, viewed from inside and behind.  Note the lower portion is a Lantrin adapter pylon (without the Lantrin pod).  The
Phoenix and Sparrow missiles each have different adapters from this (and each other) for use on the wing glove pylons.

 

Right main landing gear strut, viewed from the front. Note all the placards on the main strut.  A lot of detail can be added to the strut in model kits by simply adding these placards.  Note also (again) the multitude
of wires plumbing running all about.
  Right main wheel well, looking in from the rear right to see the front wall.  Note the retraction oleo on the small forward wheel well door.  Both forward wheel well doors on the main wheel wells are hydraulically activated, unlike the mechanical linkages on the nose wheel well doors.  Right main wheel well, looking up from the rear inside to see the outer wall and the hinge of the outer wheel well door.  Note the retraction oleo
in the front corner of the well.
 Right rear fuselage.  The dark portion at the top is the inflatable bladder that seals the fuselage against the swing wing as the wing moves in and out.  Note the wing is in the over-sweep setting and that the horizontal tail touches the wing when it sags back.

 

A little fuzzy, but another shot of the right rear fuselage.  The brown discoloration is produced by an oil vent that typically causes some amount of staining on the rear fuselage.  This is one of the largest stains I have ever seen, extending all the way onto the ventral strake. Right wing leading edge.  Note, again, how the horizontal tail actually touches the wing when the wing is in over-sweep. Topside of the right horizontal tail.  Outside of the right vertical tail.

 

 Detail of the right side fairing that fairs the fuselage into the
engine exhaust.  The hole is (I believe) a control lock point for the
horizontal tail, although I have never seen one locked.
Left engine exhaust.  Note that the irises are fully closed. Underside of the "beaver tail", showing the  attachment point of the arresting hook.  Note the hook is not barber-pole striped.  Note, also, the zinc chromate interiors of the flare/chaff dispenser mounting holes. 
Finally, note that the left lower speed brake appears to have recently replaced and is a different, more blue, color than the rest of the underside.
Back end of the "beaver tail".  The red hole is the fuel dump point. The beige item is the rear ALQ-126 antenna, paired to the ones on the wing glove area.  This antenna, like the forward ones, was introduced with block 110 F-14As and all subsequent aircraft.  Also visible is the hook portion of the arresting hook.

 

 

Right engine exhaust.  Note the irises are fully open.  When this
particular aircraft parked, the left engine shut down first.  With power still available to the aircraft systems from the right engine, the irises had chance to close on the left engine (note the earlier picture).  When this engine shut down, there was no power available to close these irises, hence they remained open.  One engine open and the other closed is the typical parked stance of the F-14A Tomcat.  The irises on the GE engines of the F-14B and F-14D are attached so that gravity can pull them open after shutdown, so typical stance for the F-14B and F-14D is both engines open.
Right engine exhaust.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside of the left rear fuselage.  While hard to make out in this picture, note the same oil stain here that is present on the right outside
fuselage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Inside of the right rear fuselage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overview of the left rear airframe.  Note the left rudder was recently replaced.  The corrosion protection people have not had chance to paint the checkers onto it, yet. Overview of the left rear fuselage.

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Overview of the left middle fuselage. 

 

 

 

 

 

 

 

Close-up of the left swing wing pivot point.  The painted lines indicate preset wing sweeps to alert the ground crews of the wing's sweep angle.  The left-most line marks the setting for a fully swept in flight wing (not over-swept).  The middle line marks a standard mid-sweep setting where the outboard wing flaps can safely be lowered.  The right-most line marks the fully unwept angle where the inboard auxiliary wing flaps can safely be lowered.

 

  Left wing glove area.  Note the ALQ-126 antennas, mirrored to the right side and paired to the single antenna on the "beaver tail".  Left forward fuselage overview.