F14-A Tomcat 

The photos in this walk around were taken by David W. Angst and "Hawk" 

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Photos taken aboard USS Yorktown - Charleston, SC

The 17 photos directly below were taken by "Hawk" 

1 2 3 4

 

5 6 7 8

 

9 10 11 12 13

 

14 15 16 17

 

 

The 55 photos directly below were taken by David W. Angst

External Pictures

Before I get to the cockpit, let me take a moment to acquaint you to the aircraft. The following are a few exterior pictures and miscellaneous details.

 

This is the left rear quartering shot of the aircraft. Note the VF-14 markings. These were applied over the VF-101 markings that adorned the aircraft when it arrived.

A close-up of the left side of the tails showing details of the markings.

This is the right side of the aircraft. No, you are not going blind. The right side really is painted in the markings of VF-202 Superheats while the left side is VF-14. The current CO of Willow Grove flew with both of these units. To honor (impress?) him, DVHAA chose to cross-mark the aircraft.

 A close-up of the right side of the tails showing details of the markings.

 

This is the right rear fuselage showing the all-important BuNo of the aircraft, 160386. The aircraft has come a long way since it was originally issued to VF-84 in 1977. Note the location and color of the BEWARE OF BLAST markings on the left side of the picture.

This is the right nose. Note the 201 modex that goes with VF-202. The left side is marked 101 as VF-14 was always a 100-series unit.

This is the left nose. Note the updated intakes for the gun-gas purge vents. When this aircraft was originally delivered, these were large panels of louvers.

This is my friend Steve doing a Tom Cruise impersonation. I must admit that I too felt the need for speed when I took a moment to sit in the pilot seat.

Note the shelf steps on the fuselage side and that they do not touch the lower side of the step opening. The way they are hinged has them leaving about a half inch space under the step. For the truely anal people out there (you know who you are), note how the shelf steps are not a uniform thickness. The side toward the back of the aircraft is thicker than the side toward the nose of the aircraft.

 

This is a close-up showing the revised gun-gas purge vents. Ignore the brown staining to the right side of the picture. This was the last shot on one of my roles of film and the photo processing people were unkind in the way that the cut my negative strips. When printed, the yellow stain you see was the result. This is the left side of the folding boarding ladder. Left is forward on the aircraft. Three items to note here are:
  • The natural metal (not painted) gun-gas louver vent.

  • The upper two steps of the folding ladder are hollow allowing them to be hand grips, as well as steps.

  • The open lower panel showing the canopy operating lever. Most kits omit providing this detail, even though most kits do provide the lowered boarding ladder.

This is an overview of the right side of the boarding ladder. Left is forward on the aircraft. This is a close-up of the right side of the boarding ladder. Note again the canopy actuating lever and the hollow upper steps.

 

This view down the left engine intake shows clearly the demarcation line for the gray-to-white painting. The opening in the upper part of the picture is the bypass vent for the intake. The white panel below this opening moves and, at high Mach, can come down to the same angle as the grat-to-white color line. There is another moving door just visible at the top of the picture that would also drop down with the rear one so the opening between them would never be much bigger then you see here. It would only shift lower so the opening leading to the engine would be decreased. This is a closer view showing the right engine intake. Again, note the color lines. In this view, the scuff marks in the paint that indicate the movement of the upper panel are more visible. See how the bypass air has a direct path to the top side of the aircraft, exiting out of large vents on top of the engine intake area. Also note the amount of dirt that builds up in the rear duct area near to the engine. This is a small top side vent that is only present on F-14A Tomcats. This is not the bypass air vent coming from the engine intake, but is some other vent apparently related to the TF30 engines of the F-14A. There is a second vent on the opposite side of the aircraft. Forward on the aircraft is toward the top of the picture. The F-14A+/B and the F-14D do not have these vents. Seeing the ducting that is under this vent is probably more than I really wanted to know about it.

 

The Front Cockpit

On to the cockpits... I realized after getting my films developed that I missed taking direct pictures of the side walls of the front cockpit. You can see them obliquely on the sides of the other pictures. As they are covered in other publications, the lack of having them here is not as critical.

This is an overview of the front, main instrument panel, looking in from the left. Note the green tinted center windshield and the circuit breaker panel by the right knee of the pilot. This is an overview of the right corner of the cockpit where the main panel and side panels meet. The Heads Up Display (HUD) on the F-14A/A+/B is unique in that it has no dedicated combining glass. Instead, the HUD images are projected directly on the center windscreen. Note all the warning lights and indicators on either side of the center windscreen, mounted to the windscreen framing. Also not the hand grip on the top center of the windscreen. Seen looking almost straight down, this is the rear portion of the right console where it meets the back wall. Also visible are some of the many latching hook points for the canopy along the edge of the cockpit sill.

 

This is the back wall behind the right elbow of the pilot. There is a small storage box located at the point where the back wall meets the side console. This is the back wall behind the left elbow of the pilot. Most of this area is filled by a large vinyl bag secured to the rear wall. Seen looking almost straight down, this is the left side console. Note how a storage bag covers much of the rear portion of the console. Also note more latching hook points for the canopy along the edge of the cockpit sill. This is an overview of the front, main instrument panel, looking in from the right. This is an closer view of the front, main instrument panel, looking in from the left. Note that there are circuit breakers at the left knee of the pilot, just like on the right side.

 

Between the Cockpits

These pictures cover the area between the cockpits that is really not belonging directly to either. Mainly it relates to the top of the rear instrument hood and the cockpit sill areas.

This overview of the right side shows the area between the cockpits and the cockpit sill. The rear main instrument panel hood is a combination of materials. The forward areas are covered by a canvas boot that is two pieces, zipped together up the middle. The color of this boot varies based on how the canvas weathers. On this aircraft, the right side of the boot is light kaki. The black portion of the instrument hood is a flexible plastic material, bent over and around the shape of the rear main instrument panel. This is the view looking aft from the front cockpit of the right side of the rear main instrument panel hood. More details of the front cockpit rear wall are visible as well as the headrest on the front cockpit ejection seat. Note the color of the canvas boot covering the rear instrument panel. This is the top of the rear instrument panel hood. The fixture in the center is a hand grip for the RIO to hang on to when the pilot is getting crazy. Note by the worn paint on the grip that this is a frequent occurrence. This is the view looking aft from the front cockpit of the left side of the rear main instrument panel hood. More details of the front cockpit rear wall are visible as well as the headrest on the front cockpit ejection seat. Note the color of the canvas boot covering the rear instrument panel. This overview of the left side shows the area between the cockpits and the cockpit sill. The rear main instrument panel hood is a combination of materials. The forward areas are covered by a canvas boot that is two pieces, zipped together up the middle. The color of this boot varies based on how the canvas weathers. On this aircraft, the left side of the boot is a medium purple/gray color. The black portion of the instrument hood is a flexible plastic material, bent over and around the shape of the rear main instrument panel.

 

 

The Rear Cockpit

I was more organized in the rear cockpit and did not miss much. The only complaint I had was that I forgot to remove the cover from the radar control grip for most of the pictures.

This is an overview of the rear main instrument panel as seen from the left side. This is an overview of the right side of the rear cockpit, showing the side console and the side wall of the cockpit. After I had taken most of the cockpit pictures, I noticed that the protective cover was still on the radar control grip. I quickly removed it and took this pictures to show it in detail. Also shown is the side of the center pedastal. Note the line where black and gray meet. This is a view of some of the massive number of circuit breakers present in the rear cockpit. Note that in addition to the two banks on the side wall, there is another bank behind the right elbow of the RIO. I am uncertain how the RIO gets to these while strapped into his seat in flight.

 

This view shows more of the right rear wall circuit breaker panel as well as details of the rear cockpit sill and the rear cockpit decking. This view shows the headrest of the rear ejection seat and the rear portion of the canopy. The pipe opening on the canopy is the connection point for the blower that provides defogging air for the rear portion of the canopy. This is the right side of the rear cockpit deck. Just visible in the center of the picture is the sole hydraulic plunger that is responsible for lifting and holding the canopy open. This is the same area as the last picture, viewed from the left side this time. Details of the upper ejection seat are show quite well in this shot.

 

This view shows the headrest of the rear ejection seat and the rear portion of the canopy. Also visible are more circuit breakers on the left rear wall of the rear cockpit. This view shows more of the left rear wall circuit breaker panel as well as details of the rear cockpit sill and the rear cockpit decking. For every circuit breaker panel on the right side, there is another one on the left side. This is an overview of the left side of the rear cockpit, showing the side console and the side wall of the cockpit. This is an overview of the rear main instrument panel as seen from the right side.

 

 

The Canopy

As the canopy is almost more visible than the cockpit on the finished model, I took extra care to get all the angles I could to capture all of its details.

This is the right side of the canopy, as viewed looking toward the back. The piping running along the bottom of the transparency is the ducting for the canopy defogger. The bright *donut* on the piping is the connection point for the forward ducting. If you look closely at the pictures of the area between the cockpits, you can find the receptacle to which this connection point attaches. This is the same area as the last picture, only this time you are looking forward. Note that the defogger ducting for the forward canopy is a separate item from the ducting for the rear canopy. This view of the center rear canopy shows the rear view mirror of the RIO and the long run of defogger ducting that circles the whole rear canopy. The black *donut* at the back end id the connection point for the rear defogger ducting. This shows the area under the canopy on the right side. Note all the plumbing in the center area.

 

This is the same area as the last picture, only this time you are looking forward. Note that the defogger ducting for the forward canopy is a separate item from the ducting for the rear canopy. This view of the center rear canopy shows the rear view mirror of the RIO and the long run of defogger ducting that circles the whole rear canopy. The black *donut* at the back end id the connection point for the rear defogger ducting. This shows the area under the canopy on the right side. Note all the plumbing in the center area. This view details the rear deck and plumbing under the rear canopy, as seen from the right side.

 

This is the view of the area under the transparency at the back of the canopy, viewed from the right side. Note the connection point for the rear canopy defogger duct and the lift point for the canopy actuator. This is the view of the canopy from the outside. Note how it rocks back over the fuselage and is not resting on the fuselage at all. There is a sizable gap between the canopy and fuselage. This is the view of the canopy from the outside. Note how it rocks back over the fuselage and is not resting on the fuselage at all. There is a sizable gap between the canopy and fuselage. This is the view of the area under the transparency at the back of the canopy, viewed from the left side.

 

This view details the rear deck and plumbing under the rear canopy, as seen from the right side. This shows the area under the canopy on the left side. Note all the plumbing in the center area. This picture (and the next) show the forward left canopy. In this picture, you are looking forward. This is the same area as the last picture, only now you are facing back. Again, take note of the connection point for the left canopy defogger duct.